Consequential improvements axed

Published:  19 December, 2012

The government has announced it has axed consequential improvement plans after industry opposition.

The government has announced it has axed consequential improvement plans after industry opposition.

The Heating & Hotwater Industry Council (HHIC) welcomed the news, as the association felt that consequential improvements to the energy efficiency of a dwelling could be very damaging for the heating industry.

The decision follows disapproval from the Builders Merchants' Federation and a consultation on the changes.

The government previously proposed that those carrying out home improvements would also have had to install other unrelated energy efficiency measures worth an additional 10% of the cost of the main works, in the way of loft or cavity insulation, upgrading a boiler or better heating controls.

HHIC says this would have been detrimental to the boiler industry as some people would have repaired old boilers rather than replacing them with more energy efficient models that would be better for the environment and their bills.

HHIC lobbied hard with industry, talking with and supplying information to DCLG, and responded to the government consultation expressing their concerns.

“Industry fully supports the government’s commitment to energy efficiency and the need to retrofit our old housing stock,” said Roger Webb, HHIC director. “However by imposing a tax on home improvements for consumers this could result in damage to an industry that is already struggling and requires much more market stimulus.