HSE is running a free event to help those who train apprentices explain the dangers of asbestos

Published:  14 February, 2013

Apprentice tradespeople are set to benefit from a new e-learning package to help them better understand the risks from asbestos.

Those who train apprentices are being offered the opportunity to find out how they can use the interactive resource at a free afternoon event at Clydebank College, Queens Quay Campus, on Wednesday, 6 March.

The event has been organised by the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) in partnership with Clydebank College, the Federation of Master Builders and the Scottish Centre for Healthy Working Lives.

It will equip lecturers and training providers with information about the ‘Introduction to Asbestos Training Package’, developed by HSE, that includes a lesson plan, power point presentation, notes for lecturers, task sheets and posters.

HSE principal inspector Archie Mitchell said: "This event continues HSE's drive to tackle ignorance about Britain's biggest industrial killer. Many young tradespeople believe that because asbestos is no longer used in buildings it's no longer a threat to them. But that simply isn't true. The material was widely used in domestic, commercial and industrial premises. Such buildings contain asbestos materials now and will continue to do so for many years into the future."

"I want to encourage those involved in training our workers of the future to join us to ensure they are aware of this new package to help get this important message across."

Approximately 4,000 people across Great Britain die each year due to asbestos-related diseases. Asbestos can be found in many buildings built or refurbished before 2000, the group of workers now most at risk is the 1.8 million tradespeople who routinely disturb the fabric of buildings during their work.

The 'Introduction to Asbestos' learning package is available on the HSE website.

For more information and to reserve a place at the event, please email Linda Aitken: Linda.aitken@hse.gsi.gov.uk

Sign Up

Sign up to our weekly eNewsletter to receive all the latest news direct to your inbox